A review of risk factors and patterns of motorcycle injuries

Mau Roung Lin, Jess F. Kraus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

202 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Per vehicle mile traveled, motorcycle riders have a 34-fold higher risk of death in a crash than people driving other types of motor vehicles. While lower-extremity injuries most commonly occur in all motorcycle crashes, head injuries are most frequent in fatal crashes. Helmets and helmet use laws have been shown to be effective in reducing head injuries and deaths from motorcycle crashes. Alcohol is the major contributing factor to fatal crashes. Enforcement of legal limits on the blood alcohol concentration is effective in reducing motorcycle deaths, while some alcohol-related interventions such as a minimal legal drinking age, increased alcohol excise taxes, and responsible beverage service specifically for motorcycle riders have not been examined. Other modifiable protective or risk factors comprise inexperience and driver training, conspicuity and daytime headlight laws, motorcycle licensure and ownership, riding speed, and risk-taking behaviors. Features of motorcycle use and potentially effective prevention programs for motorcycle crash injuries in developing countries are discussed. Finally, recommendations for future motorcycle-injury research are made.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)710-722
Number of pages13
JournalAccident Analysis and Prevention
Volume41
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2009

Fingerprint

Motorcycles
motorcycle
Wounds and Injuries
Alcohols
alcohol
Head Protective Devices
death
Craniocerebral Trauma
Driver training
Headlights
driver training
Beverages
Law
Ownership
Taxes
Motor Vehicles
Licensure
Risk-Taking
Taxation
Developing countries

Keywords

  • Alcohol consumption
  • Developing countries
  • Head injury
  • Helmet
  • Motorcycle crash
  • Risk factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Human Factors and Ergonomics
  • Law
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

A review of risk factors and patterns of motorcycle injuries. / Lin, Mau Roung; Kraus, Jess F.

In: Accident Analysis and Prevention, Vol. 41, No. 4, 07.2009, p. 710-722.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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