A nationwide population-based study of corrosive ingestion in Taiwan

Incidence, gender differences, and mortality

Chuan Mei Chen, Yueh Chin Chung, Li Hung Tsai, Yi Chen Tung, Horng Mo Lee, Mei Ling Lin, Hsin Li Liu, Woung Ru Tang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Corrosive injury results from the intake of corrosive-acid-based chemicals. However, this phenomenon is limited to a small number of cases and cannot be extrapolated to the epidemiology of corrosive injuries in actual situations. This study focuses on the annual incidence of corrosive injury and its connection to gender, risk factors, and in-hospital mortality. All patients with corrosive injury (ICD-9 947.0-947.3) were identified using a nationwide inpatient sample from 1996 until 2010. Chi-squared tests and multivariate logistic regression were used to examine risk factors of gender differences and in-hospital mortality of corrosive injury. Young adults comprised the majority of patients (71.2%), and mean age was 44.6 ± 20.9 years. Women showed a higher incidence rate of corrosive injuries, age, suicide, psychiatric disorder, and systemic complications compared with men (p <0.001). The present study demonstrated that age (OR = 10.93; 95% CI 5.37-22.27), systemic complications (OR = 5.43; 95% CI 4.61-6.41), malignant neoplasms (OR = 2.23; 95% CI 1.37-3.62), gastrointestinal complications (OR = 2.02; 95% CI 1.63-2.51), chronic disease (OR = 1.30; 95% CI 1.08-1.56), and suicide (OR = 1.23; 95% CI 1.05-1.44) were strongly associated with in-hospital mortality. Educational programs may be helpful for reducing the incidence of ingestion of corrosive chemicals.

Original languageEnglish
Article number7905425
JournalGastroenterology Research and Practice
Volume2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Fingerprint

Caustics
Taiwan
Eating
Mortality
Incidence
Population
Wounds and Injuries
Hospital Mortality
Suicide
International Classification of Diseases
Psychiatry
Inpatients
Young Adult
Epidemiology
Chronic Disease
Logistic Models
Acids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology
  • Hepatology

Cite this

A nationwide population-based study of corrosive ingestion in Taiwan : Incidence, gender differences, and mortality. / Chen, Chuan Mei; Chung, Yueh Chin; Tsai, Li Hung; Tung, Yi Chen; Lee, Horng Mo; Lin, Mei Ling; Liu, Hsin Li; Tang, Woung Ru.

In: Gastroenterology Research and Practice, Vol. 2016, 7905425, 2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chen, Chuan Mei ; Chung, Yueh Chin ; Tsai, Li Hung ; Tung, Yi Chen ; Lee, Horng Mo ; Lin, Mei Ling ; Liu, Hsin Li ; Tang, Woung Ru. / A nationwide population-based study of corrosive ingestion in Taiwan : Incidence, gender differences, and mortality. In: Gastroenterology Research and Practice. 2016 ; Vol. 2016.
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