A cost-consequence analysis of long-acting injectable risperidone in schizophrenia

A one-year mirror-image study with national claim-based database in Taiwan

Hui Chih Chang, Chao Hsiun Tang, Sheng Tzu Huang, Paul McCrone, Kuan Pin Su

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The development of long-acting atypical antipsychotics has provided a new paradigm for schizophrenia treatment. The economic effectiveness of risperidone long-acting injection (RLAI) on service costs has, however, never been studied in the real world with national claim-based database. Method: To assess the change of service utilization and costs for schizophrenia before and after RLAI treatment, we conducted this 1-year mirror-image study with Taiwanese national claimed-data. Comparison was made for service sectors (the number of visits, acute admissions and relapse events) and cost components (outpatient, inpatient, emergency, medication and non-medication costs). Results: Service uses reduced in the post-RLAI period, along with a reduction of 34% and 32% on total inpatient services costs and inpatient non-medication costs, respectively (p <0.005). However, overall psychiatric service costs went up by 26%, with an increase of 190% on total outpatient service costs and 177% on overall medication costs (p <0.0001). Conclusions: This 1-year mirror-image analysis showed that RLAI treatment was associated with reductions of service uses; however, overall psychiatric service costs were compromised by costs incurred from increased utilization of outpatient service and RLAI medication costs under the context of healthcare in Taiwan.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)751-756
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Psychiatric Research
Volume46
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2012

Fingerprint

Risperidone
Taiwan
Schizophrenia
Databases
Costs and Cost Analysis
Injections
Inpatients
Ambulatory Care
Psychiatry
Costs
Data Base
Antipsychotic Agents
Emergencies
Outpatients
Therapeutics
Economics

Keywords

  • Antipsychotics
  • Mirror-image study
  • Psychiatric Inpatients Medical Claims Data (PIMC)
  • Relapse
  • Service costs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

A cost-consequence analysis of long-acting injectable risperidone in schizophrenia : A one-year mirror-image study with national claim-based database in Taiwan. / Chang, Hui Chih; Tang, Chao Hsiun; Huang, Sheng Tzu; McCrone, Paul; Su, Kuan Pin.

In: Journal of Psychiatric Research, Vol. 46, No. 6, 06.2012, p. 751-756.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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