A bacterial pioneer produces cellulase complexes that persist through community succession

Sebastian Kolinko, Yu Wei Wu, Firehiwot Tachea, Evelyn Denzel, Jennifer Hiras, Raphael Gabriel, Nora Bäcker, Leanne Jade G. Chan, Stephanie A. Eichorst, Dario Frey, Qiushi Chen, Parastoo Azadi, Paul D. Adams, Todd R. Pray, Deepti Tanjore, Christopher J. Petzold, John M. Gladden, Blake A. Simmons, Steven W. Singer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Cultivation of microbial consortia provides low-complexity communities that can serve as tractable models to understand community dynamics. Time-resolved metagenomics demonstrated that an aerobic cellulolytic consortium cultivated from compost exhibited community dynamics consistent with the definition of an endogenous heterotrophic succession. The genome of the proposed pioneer population, 'Candidatus Reconcilibacillus cellulovorans', possessed a gene cluster containing multidomain glycoside hydrolases (GHs). Purification of the soluble cellulase activity from a 300litre cultivation of this consortium revealed that ∼70% of the activity arose from the 'Ca. Reconcilibacillus cellulovorans' multidomain GHs assembled into cellulase complexes through glycosylation. These remarkably stable complexes have supramolecular structures for enzymatic cellulose hydrolysis that are distinct from cellulosomes. The persistence of these complexes during cultivation indicates that they may be active through multiple cultivations of this consortium and act as public goods that sustain the community. The provision of extracellular GHs as public goods may influence microbial community dynamics in native biomass-deconstructing communities relevant to agriculture, human health and biotechnology.

LanguageEnglish
Pages99-107
Number of pages9
JournalNature Microbiology
Volume3
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2018

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Cellulase
Glycoside Hydrolases
Cellulosomes
Microbial Consortia
Metagenomics
Biotechnology
Multigene Family
Agriculture
Glycosylation
Cellulose
Biomass
Hydrolysis
Soil
Genome
Health
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
  • Genetics
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Cell Biology

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A bacterial pioneer produces cellulase complexes that persist through community succession. / Kolinko, Sebastian; Wu, Yu Wei; Tachea, Firehiwot; Denzel, Evelyn; Hiras, Jennifer; Gabriel, Raphael; Bäcker, Nora; Chan, Leanne Jade G.; Eichorst, Stephanie A.; Frey, Dario; Chen, Qiushi; Azadi, Parastoo; Adams, Paul D.; Pray, Todd R.; Tanjore, Deepti; Petzold, Christopher J.; Gladden, John M.; Simmons, Blake A.; Singer, Steven W.

In: Nature Microbiology, Vol. 3, No. 1, 01.01.2018, p. 99-107.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kolinko, S, Wu, YW, Tachea, F, Denzel, E, Hiras, J, Gabriel, R, Bäcker, N, Chan, LJG, Eichorst, SA, Frey, D, Chen, Q, Azadi, P, Adams, PD, Pray, TR, Tanjore, D, Petzold, CJ, Gladden, JM, Simmons, BA & Singer, SW 2018, 'A bacterial pioneer produces cellulase complexes that persist through community succession' Nature Microbiology, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 99-107. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41564-017-0052-z
Kolinko, Sebastian ; Wu, Yu Wei ; Tachea, Firehiwot ; Denzel, Evelyn ; Hiras, Jennifer ; Gabriel, Raphael ; Bäcker, Nora ; Chan, Leanne Jade G. ; Eichorst, Stephanie A. ; Frey, Dario ; Chen, Qiushi ; Azadi, Parastoo ; Adams, Paul D. ; Pray, Todd R. ; Tanjore, Deepti ; Petzold, Christopher J. ; Gladden, John M. ; Simmons, Blake A. ; Singer, Steven W. / A bacterial pioneer produces cellulase complexes that persist through community succession. In: Nature Microbiology. 2018 ; Vol. 3, No. 1. pp. 99-107.
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