5-Aminolevulinic acid induced photodynamic inactivation on Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

Chien Ming Hsieh, Yen Hao Huang, Chueh Pin Chen, Bo Chuan Hsieh, Tsuimin Tsai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of the present study was to develop a simple and fast screening technique to directly evaluate the bactericidal effects of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-mediated photodynamic inactivation (PDI) and to determine the optimal antibacterial conditions of ALA concentrations and the total dosage of light in vitro. The effects of PDI on Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the presence of various concentrations of ALA (1.0 mM, 2.5 mM, 5.0 mM, 10.0 mM) were examined. All bacterial strains were exponentially grown in the culture medium at room temperature in the dark for 60 minutes and subsequently irradiated with 630 ± 5 nm using a light-emitting diode (LED) red light device for accumulating the light doses up to 216 J/cm2. Both bacterial species were susceptible to the ALA-induced PDI. Photosensitization using 1.0 mM ALA with 162 J/cm2 light dose was able to completely reduce the viable counts of S. aureus. A significant decrease in the bacterial viabilities was observed for P. aeruginosa, where 5.0 mM ALA was photosensitized by accumulating the light dose of 162 J/cm2. We demonstrated that the use of microplate-based assays - by measuring the apparent optical density of bacterial colonies at 595 nm - was able to provide a simple and reliable approach for quickly choosing the parameters of ALA-mediated PDI in the cell suspensions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)350-355
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Food and Drug Analysis
Volume22
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Aminolevulinic Acid
aminolevulinic acid
Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Staphylococcus aureus
inactivation
Light
dosage
Microbial Viability
Photosensitivity Disorders
antibacterial properties
red light
cell suspension culture
absorbance
Culture Media
Suspensions
ambient temperature
culture media
viability
screening
Equipment and Supplies

Keywords

  • 5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA)
  • Light-emitting diode
  • Photodynamic inactivation
  • Pseudomonas aeruginosa
  • Staphylococcus aureus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

5-Aminolevulinic acid induced photodynamic inactivation on Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. / Hsieh, Chien Ming; Huang, Yen Hao; Chen, Chueh Pin; Hsieh, Bo Chuan; Tsai, Tsuimin.

In: Journal of Food and Drug Analysis, Vol. 22, No. 3, 2014, p. 350-355.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hsieh, Chien Ming ; Huang, Yen Hao ; Chen, Chueh Pin ; Hsieh, Bo Chuan ; Tsai, Tsuimin. / 5-Aminolevulinic acid induced photodynamic inactivation on Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In: Journal of Food and Drug Analysis. 2014 ; Vol. 22, No. 3. pp. 350-355.
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