Effects of Regular Exercise on Emotional Control and Cognitive Function of Prefrontal-Limbic Pathway in Sleep-Deprived Rats---An Analysis by Behavior and Neurostructural Correlates

Project: A - Government Institutionb - Ministry of Science and Technology

Description

Sleep deprivation is the condition whereby fail to have enough sleep. Several studies have indicated that sleep deprivation impairs emotional control and cognitive function through weakening prefrontal-limbic neural plasticity. The weakening plasticity is associated with functional impairment of neurotransmitter systems, uneven electrolyte distribution, and reversible blood-brain barrier dysfunction. Exercise, especially moderate-intensity exercise has been demonstrated to improve emotional control and cognitive function through increased neural activity in prefrontal-limbic system. Moreover, several reports indicated that exercise avoid the electrolyte imbalance as well asas well asas well asas well asas well asas well as as well asas well asas well as reduce the reversible disruption of blood-brain barrier integrity in prefrontal-limbic system. Although previous studies have extensively demonstrated the deleterious effects of sleep deprivation on mental function and the contrasting beneficial effects of exercise on this function. Nevertheless, there has thus far been relatively little research into the interaction of the two at the molecular level in prefrontal-limbic system. Based on the above-mentioned points, we hypothesize that exercise can reduce sleep deprivation-induced impairment of emotional control and cognitive function. The mechanism is mediated through activation of neurotransmitter systems, correction for the uneven distribution of electrolytes, and amelioration of blood-brain barrier dysfunction in prefrontal-limbic system. The specific aims of this 3-year project are as follows: (1) to develop rat models of sleep deprivation and exercise to assess emotional control and cognitive function using behavioral tests and stress hormone monitoring, (2) to determine if moderate exercise training can diminish the deleterious effects of sleep deprivation through activation of three types of neurotransmitter systems (cholinergic, dopaminergic, and serotonergic) in prefrontal-limbic areas using cytochrome oxidase histochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and Western blotting, (3) to examine if moderate exercise training can reduce reversible disruption of blood-brain barrier integrity and avoid the ion imbalance caused by sleep deprivation in prefrontal-limbic system using electron microscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date8/1/157/31/16

Keywords

  • regular exercise
  • cerebrum
  • prefrontal cortex
  • limbic system
  • neuroplasticity